Panda Escapades

coelasquid:

k-eke:

The new season is about gymnastic and rap battles, I’m so hyped !

I am moved to tears.

"After wrapping Guardians of the Galaxy I was very homesick and I was coming home to my wife and my son, who at the time was 13 months old. My wife told me ‘Hey, listen there’s a chance he may not recognize you and he may be a little shy’ and so I came in there, and he just sat right up and had this big smile on his face. He started saying ‘Daddy, daddy, daddy!’ and I just started to cry. He saw the tears in my eyes and started doing bits to make me laugh and that just made me cry more."

- Chris Pratt on the best day of his life.

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” 

Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. 

Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. 

When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”

Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”

You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.

To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/

For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.

For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

girldoesnothing:

tonidorsay:

I travel the world for the perfect tea
Everybody’s looking for Darjeeling

Some of them want to infuse you
Some of them want to be infused by you

girldoesnothing:

tonidorsay:

I travel the world for the perfect tea

Everybody’s looking for Darjeeling

Some of them want to infuse you

Some of them want to be infused by you

annethecatdetective:

burning-high-rise:

whorishgreen:

whorishgreen:

I’ve never been more emotional about any social media post in my entire life

UPDATE: guys Beth Broderick tweeted yesterday that this Salem is THE SAME SALEM!!! He’s 20 years old man!!!! 20!

That Salem is still kicking is all I care about.

ya-ssui:

Don’t be scared. I’m a shapeshifter too!

ya-ssui:

Don’t be scared. I’m a shapeshifter too!

271,917 plays

badbunnyfoofoo:

just-paper:

pal3trash:

I hate that gif for fitting the song perfectly

That should not have been that fun to dance to

khaipie:

What is it about The Capital in The Hunger Games that is so wrong?

Is it the killing of innocent children?

Is it the oppression of the districts?

Is it the media censorship?

Is it the attacks on peaceful protesters? 

Is it the denial of basic human rights?

Does any of this sound familiar?

If it’s clear in fiction why is it so hard to see that what’s happening in Ferguson is so wrong?

moarrrmagazine:

Floating Recipes by Nora Luther and Pavel Becker

asylum-art:

Gorgeously Captures Intricate Paper Marbling Process by Oguz Uygur

Turkish filmmaker Oguz Uygur has gorgeously captured his parents’ delicate craft of erbu, also known as paper marbling. To create these beautiful patterns, first a tray is filled with water. Next, paint or ink is spilled, dabbed, dripped, sprayed, fanned, and/or pulled across the surface of the water. Sometimes additives and chemicals are applied to the mixture to create various textures. Thin wires are used to pull paint or ink into intricate patterns, with deliberate care taken for each design. Finally, a piece of washi paper is placed onto the water/paint surface with the intent to stain the pattern onto the paper. The paper is then allowed to dry before being used for calligraphy, book covers, and endpapers in bookbinding and stationery.This marbling method was first developed in East and Central Asia, as well as the Islamic world and is currently an important part of Turkish, Tajik, Indian, and other Asian and Middle Eastern cultures. Some of the marbled designs and patterns are reminiscent of the woven carpets typically found in similar regions. Uygur’s short film captures amazing detail and depth of field using close-up shots demonstrating the intricate attention paid to this form ofaqueous surface design.

Seyit UYGUR { Ebru Artist } from oguz uygur (ozzie) on Vimeo.